Philip E. Wolgin, Ph.D.

Recent Work

Check out some of my recent and favorite columns, reports, and articles:

The Economic Benefits of Passing the Dream Act

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Passing the Dream Act and putting young unauthorized immigrants on a pathway to citizenship would bring substantial benefits for the U.S. economy.

(Center for American Progress)

Understanding Trump’s Flimsy Case Against So-Called Sanctuary Jurisdictions

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The Trump administration defines so-called sanctuary jurisdictions as those violating 8 U.S.C. 1373 but has not identified a single jurisdiction in violation of this statute.

(Center for American Progress)

The High Cost of Ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals

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Ending DACA and kicking recipients out of the workforce would cost the nation $433.4 billion in GDP cumulatively over a decade.

(Center for American Progress)

A Short-Term Plan to Address the Central American Refugee Situation

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In the short term, the United States must protect Central American asylum seekers.

(Center for American Progress)

Symbolic Politics and Policy Feedback: The United Nations Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees and American Refugee Policy in the Cold War

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Legal and bureaucratic mobilization by refugee advocates throughout the 1970s drew on the largely-symbolic Senate ratification of the UN Protocol on the Status of Refugees in 1968, achieving incremental policy change even before the passage of the 1980 Refugee Act, and ultimately shaping the provisions of the Act itself.

(International Migration Review)

Our Gratitude to Our Soldiers: Military Spouses, Family Re-Unification, and Postwar Immigration Reform

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The perceived need to re-unite military families after World War II played a key role in the reformulation of U.S. immigration policy. The combination of wartime service, patriotism, and marriage formed an inadvertent road map for the post-1965 family-centric and racially neutral admissions policies.

(Journal of Interdisciplinary History)